An Update on What We’ve Been Doing For 3 Months

At the end of 2015 we told you we were taking a break from writing these blog updates, but not a break from our greater journey. We talked about how taking time off can be a difficult yet necessary decision. We love writing these posts and that decision back in December was difficult. Looking back, it was also a really great choice.

We’ve been up to a lot and I would love to update you on the highlights right now.

The beginning of 2016 has been dedicated to planning and preparation. There are six expeditions ahead of us that we hope to accomplish in two years. Five of those require being dropped in remote areas via chartered flights. Four will be involve traversing glaciers and dealing with avalanches. Two will require rock climbing skills. All of them will be difficult.

Knowing this means we know what we have to work on. On the glacier expeditions we hope to skin our way up the mountains and ski/snowboard down. So we need to practice or skiing/snowboarding. We also need to train in crevasse rescue and avalanche safety. For the expeditions that involve climbing, we need to learn how to lead climb and practice trad (outdoor) climbing as well. Then there are all the logistics of contacting parks, charter flight operators, preparing meal plans, etc.

Here is what we’ve been doing so far

Skiing/Snowboarding

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  • The-Peakbaggers-Skiing-Snowboarding (4)
  • The-Peakbaggers-Skiing-Snowboarding (3)
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  • The-Peakbaggers-Skiing-Snowboarding (1)
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We spent the winter practicing our skiing and snowboarding. I’ve been snowboarding my whole life, but haven’t been in the past two seasons, so this was a good refresher. Andrea and I both really worked on our control and carving. It was Andrea’s second season skiing, so I’m sure she’ll share many more updates on how she progressed.

Climbing

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  • The-Peakbaggers-Basecamp (1)

A new climbing gym, Basecamp, opened very close to where Andrea and I live and we took this as a chance to climb and climb often. The walls are 40ft tall (the highest in Toronto) and spending three sessions a week there is definitely challenging our bodies. I’ve also been working with the staff on getting some coaching tips for training and will be sharing those on the blog soon.

Reading

It’s one thing to get our bodies right for these excursions. Getting our minds ready is an important factor too. As we’ve already learned on our past six expeditions, there is a lot of stress that comes with being isolated in the wilderness. These upcoming expeditions will only be more difficult, more isolated, and more stressful.

Over the past three months I took to reading a lot more about mountaineering and plan to continue this habit. So far I’ve read the following books:

  • Not Won In A Day – an account of Jack Bennet on being the first person to summit the highest point in every Canadian Province and Territory. (we hope to be the first all-Canadian team). This book is a great resource to plan for our excursions and includes lots of maps and trip details.
  • Wild – the account of Cheryl Strayed hiking a large portion of The PCT. This book really showcased what it means to have perseverance. It gave me the confidence that if I put my mind to something and stick with it, I can do anything.
  • Into Thin Air – the harrowing account of the 1996 tragedy on Mt. Everest. This book is an incredibly well-written, detailed, and dramatic account of how a bunch of small mistakes can lead to big errors. Despite the terror and tragedy, it only inspired me more to be in the mountains.

 


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